Opinions sought on road safety

Both the Issues Paper and Community Attitudes Survey are available online  at: www.yoursay.sa.gov.au/- roadsafety.
Both the Issues Paper and Community Attitudes Survey are available online at: www.yoursay.sa.gov.au/- roadsafety.

Research by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare shows that people living outside the major cities have nearly twice the rate of serious road-related injury as those living within them.

Tragically, the death rate in transport-related accidents for young men aged 20 to 24 years living in the country is nearly four times higher than it is for those in the same age group in the city.

These startling statistics can be attributed to a combination of factors, including vehicle and road characteristics, transport habits, perceptions of risk and law enforcement rates.

Another finding showed that country people are three times more likely to die as a result of a transport accident, than their city cousins.

The National Rural Health Alliance (NRHA) has reminded everyone of the risks involved in driving on country roads, and while much can be done to improve road safety in rural and remote areas, it’s up to drivers, passengers, cyclists and pedestrians to be constantly vigilant.

South Australians are now being asked to have their say about road safety measures, to drive down the road toll and reduce injuries on our roads.

Road Safety Minister Tony Piccolo has launched a Community Attitudes Survey that seeks the community’s views about what needs to be done to change people’s behaviours.

“This is an opportunity for you to contribute and make a difference,” Mr Piccolo said.

“The survey focuses on some key areas such as speeding, alcohol and drugs, mobile phone use and driver training and licensing.

“Together, we need to seriously consider options to address these important issues and bring down the road toll.

Along with the survey, an Issues Paper has also been released which provides background about road safety in South Australia and outlines various road safety measures that have been proven to reduce road trauma.

Mr Piccolo said the paper would give South Australians an understanding about various road safety measures that have proven to reduce road trauma.

“I would encourage everyone to read the paper and then complete the survey,” he said.

The Motor Accident Commission will also use the survey results to help with the development of road safety educational programs.

General manager Road Safety Michael Cornish said this would be useful to help target specific areas of concern for South Australians.

“This survey of community views on a wide range of road safety issues will provide important information for MAC,” Mr Cornish said.

Both the Issues Paper and Community Attitudes Survey are available online  at: http://www.yoursay.sa.gov.au/- roadsafety.

The survey will be open until 5pm, Friday, May 29, 2015.

Both the Issues Paper and Community Attitudes Survey are available online  at: www.yoursay .sa. gov.au/ - roadsafety.

Both the Issues Paper and Community Attitudes Survey are available online at: www.yoursay .sa. gov.au/ - roadsafety.