KI private properties key to glossy black-cockatoo conservation

CUTE BABY: An adorable glossy black-cockatoo chick at one of the plantation nests on Kangaroo Island.
CUTE BABY: An adorable glossy black-cockatoo chick at one of the plantation nests on Kangaroo Island.

Kangaroo Island has a vast network of parks, however approximately 36 per cent of the Island’s native vegetation is on private properties.

This makes private land very important for the conservation of several threatened species that Natural Resources Kangaroo Island are working hard to help. 

The glossy black-cockatoo is one such species that relies heavily on the patches of native vegetation that remain on private properties. 

Its key habitat types tend to occur where agricultural clearance took place, and hence around 70 per cent of nests are located on private property.

Glossy Black-cockatoo Recovery Program manager Karleah Berris said that the private landholders cooperation had been vital.

“Majority of landholders on Kangaroo Island with glossy-black cockatoo habitat on their properties allow our staff access to their land to protect nests from possums,” Ms Berris said.

“This cooperation and interest from the community is what has made this program such a success, and we thank all landholders who have so willingly played their part over the years in helping this species to recover.  

“Around 10 per cent of all known glossy black-cockatoo nests occur in native vegetation adjacent to Tasmanian blue-gum plantations, so it has also been really important to be able to work collaboratively with landowners such as Kangaroo Island Plantation Timbers.”

KIPT had not only provided $72,500 sponsorship for the KI cockatoo recovery program for this financial year, but also took a keen interest in the flocks of glossies that occur on its properties, she said. 

KIPT managing director John Sergeant and executive director Shauna Black had both taken the time to hear first-hand from recovery program staff about the flocks on their properties and the work of the recovery program more broadly. 

 “The glossy black-cockatoo is important to the Kangaroo Island community and with more than 7000 hectares of native vegetation on our plantation properties, we are keen to manage it in a way that supports the recovery program,” Ms Black said.

To learn more about the Glossy Black-cockatoo Recovery Program and read NRKI’s latest newsletter, and please visit our website at http://www.naturalresources.sa.gov.au/kangarooisland/plants-and-animals/native-animals/glossy-black-cockatoo-recovery

Comments

Discuss "KI private properties key to glossy black-cockatoo conservation"

Please note: All comments made or shown here are bound by the Online Discussion Terms & Conditions.