KI Airport charity events and art sales

KI AIRPORT: The new Kangaroo Island Airport terminal building is a finalist in the 2018 World Architecture Festival being held in Amsterdam. The building was designed by architect Ashley Halliday and his father Ian Halliday of the firm Ashley Halliday Architects in Adelaide.
KI AIRPORT: The new Kangaroo Island Airport terminal building is a finalist in the 2018 World Architecture Festival being held in Amsterdam. The building was designed by architect Ashley Halliday and his father Ian Halliday of the firm Ashley Halliday Architects in Adelaide.

There has been some discussion as to whether it is Kangaroo Island Airport or Kingscote Airport.

According to the council’s CEO Andrew Boardman it is both. 

The airport is properly known as Kangaroo Island (Kingscote) Airport (KGC), Mr Boardman said.

The IATA  (International Air Transport Association) airport code cannot be change to KIA as that acronym is already taken by Kaiapit Airport in remote Papua New Guinea. 

The acronym also has the unsavoury connotation of “Killed in Action” and hence is probably not a good choice anyway.

The council however now prefers to refer to the facility as Kangaroo Island Airport to reflect the fact that it serves the entire island and is more recognisable for national and international visitors. 

The airport technically however is not in Kingscote as it is about 15km out of town and in the locality of Cygnet River, which is named after not a bird but rather one of the first ships to arrive and drop off pioneers for the South Australia company.

The new airport terminal building meanwhile is already receiving international recognition being named a finalist in the 2018 World Architecture Festival being held in Amsterdam this year and is one of 12 projects nominated in the transport category. 

The building was designed by architect Ashley Halliday and his father Ian Halliday of the firm Ashley Halliday Architects in Adelaide. 

The $21 million upgrade of the airport included a range of works, including improvements to the existing runway, taxiways and lighting, has raised the airport’s airside facilities to IATA Class C standards. 

The new runway has been lengthened from 1402m to 1812m, and these works enable the airport to provide direct air access to East Coast markets, which will help increase the number of domestic and international tourists.

KI Airport is already handling the 74-seater QantasLink Bombardier Dash 8 Q400s and similar size charter aircraft and business jets such as  Alliance Airlines VIP-configured F70 jet aircraft. 

Mr Boardman said it was hoped that QantasLink can expand its Q400 service over and above the current peak holiday season, connecting KI to Melbourne over the whole year. 

“In the future, our aim is to see Qantas start bringing in its larger Boeing 717-200 or Fokker F100 aircraft, carrying 100-120 passengers, from Sydney and other eastern seaboard capital cities,” he said.

Airport security has also been improved with the addition of a new check-in area, a secure departure lounge and revamps of the passenger and baggage screening area.

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