KIPT releases updated seaport plans to shareholders

NEW PLAN: The new plan for the proposed KIPT Smith Bay seaport included in the company's AGM document shows a jetty extending out from the causeway. It is incorrectly labelled as a "linkspan bridge".

NEW PLAN: The new plan for the proposed KIPT Smith Bay seaport included in the company's AGM document shows a jetty extending out from the causeway. It is incorrectly labelled as a "linkspan bridge".

Kangaroo Island Plantation Timbers has released additional information about its proposed seaport structure at Smith Bay on Kangaroo Island.

The updated seaport layout was included in its annual general meeting document issued to shareholders, shows a jetty extending out from the rock causeway.

Managing director John Sergeant said that this design was not new and was released to the Australian Stock Exchange back in July.

At the end of the jetty, there was a link-span bridge connecting the floating pontoon where the Panamax-size container ships would tie up to load.

The entire structure was about 300 metres in length, about the same length at the Kingscote jetty, he said.

The area directly out from the pontoon would be dredged to allow the large ships to manoeuvre, and the dredged material would be pumped back to shore and allowed to settle in ponds, he said. Coarser material would be used to form the core of the causeway.

2016 PLAN: The previous seaport plan released by KIPT in 2016.

2016 PLAN: The previous seaport plan released by KIPT in 2016.

In other developments, KIPT in its quarterly letter to shareholders broaches the subject of other users using the seaport.

Mr Sergeant wrote that other “stranded timber assets” on the Fleurieu Peninsula could be shipped to Kangaroo Island to be exported from the seaport.

Mr Sergeant also writes about the seaport being used to import bulky goods onto Kangaroo Island also possibly exporting material such as hay to feed livestock overseas and in drought areas. He also mentions the possibility of cruise ships docking.  

KIPT’s environmental impact statement for the project is currently being reviewed by the State and Federal governments, that will decide whether their concerns had been sufficiently addressed before releasing the EIS for public exhibition and comment.

The Wilderness Society has now listed its concerns with the project.

“Smith Bay is a completely inappropriate location for another port, both from an environmental and public safety perspective,” said Wilderness Society South Australia director Peter Owen.

“The coastal vegetation in the area and the pristine marine environment must be protected. Log truck traffic on the long haul down to Smith Bay, coupled with the fact that the Bay is exposed to the northerly weather, creates a tourist hazard and raises serious public safety concerns.”

“Surely there are more appropriate locations than Smith Bay, locations that don't potentially undermine Kangaroo Island's future as a world leader in sustainability and eco-tourism.”

In a separate development, the AusOcean group is planning to conduct an extensive marine life survey of Smith Bay and adjoining waters this December. 

AusOcean was founded by Kangaroo Island landowner and former head of engineering for Google, Alan Noble.

While he said KIPT also commissioned a report on marine life, the geographical scope of the company’s assessment was quite limited by comparison with what he planned.

“Although I personally care about KI's marine environment, AusOcean is still very much in fact finding mode when it comes to Smith Bay,” Mr Noble said.

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