KI Council tours proposed Dudley cat-proof fence location | PHOTOS

The Kangaroo Island Council on June 20 toured the proposed location of the proposed cat-proof fence across the Dudley Peninsula.

The fence would be built at the narrowest point of Kangaoo Island stretching about 2.7 kilometres, cutting off the Dudley Peninsula from the rest of Kangaroo Island.

Leading the tour was Natural Resources KI regional director Damian Miley and sustainable development manager for KI, Mike Greig.

The councillors were informed the Department for Environment and Water was keen to make physical progress on the cat proof fence following the allocation of $2 million to "The Safe Haven for Threatened Species Project".

The fence would extend along a mix of Crown land and shared road reserve between the cliffs on the south side of the narrowest point across to the north side and Pelican Lagoon.

The initial concept was to have four two-metre gaps at strategic locations to allow native wildlife to cross.

These gaps would be monitored electronically to see how many native animals and also feral cats were crossing, how frequently and exactly which of the four locations.

Both Hog Bay Road and old Hog Bay Road would also have to be left open and monitored, in addition to the four other gaps.

Scientists and rangers after gathering information from wildlife monitoring camera could then make the call as to how stop the movement of cats and enable wildlife and appropriate human movement on the roads, including the location of traps and Felixer devices.

The councillors were generally supportive of the concept and the use of the shared road reserves for the fence.

The shared roadway route across the narrowest point of the Dudley Peninsula had also been earmarked as the path of the water pipeline to the proposed golf course, now on hold.

Deputy mayor Bob Teasdale said residents in the area were keen to see the speed limit on the Pelican Lagoon stretch of Hog Bay Road reduced to 80km/h.

This would reduce road deaths for native animals and also facilitate the roadway interface with the cat fence.

Clr Sam Mumford made practical suggestions as to the design of the fence from an agricultural and stock movement perspective.

The council will now work with the Department to formalise the route along the shared road reserve, negating any need to encroach on private property.

The State Environment Minister has jurisdiction over the Crown land portions required for the fence, and is obviously in favour of the project.

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