Question time in federal parliament

Prime Minister Scott Morrison greeted US Ambassador Arthur B. Culvahouse Jr. before Question Time.
Prime Minister Scott Morrison greeted US Ambassador Arthur B. Culvahouse Jr. before Question Time.

WHAT WE LEARNED

* Question time began with recognition of the 50th anniversary of the moon landing.

* The US ambassador to Australia, Arthur Culvahouse, was in the House chamber for question time.

* 2.9 million Australians have lodged their tax returns, up 460,000 on the same time last year.

* Labor wants a departmental inquiry into former ministers Christopher Pyne and Julie Bishop's post-parliament roles reopened.

--

WHAT THE GOVERNMENT WANTED TO SPIN

Why won't the opposition support the government's drought support plan and anti-terrorism laws

--

WHAT LABOR WANTED TO TALK ABOUT

Why is the government unnecessarily politicising national security and support for farmers

--

WHAT THEY SAID

"Does the prime minister doubt which side people are on when they support the unanimous position of the parliamentary joint committee on intelligence and security?" - Labor leader Anthony Albanese.

"What I have noted in my time in this place is that it has always been those who sit on this side of the house have always brought the stronger position." - Prime Minister Scott Morrison on national security.

"There's no change to the government's policy." - Morrison, asked whether he would dump the rise in the superannuation guarantee.

"The leader of the opposition is opposition with a capital 'O'." - Morrison on Albanese.

"The integrity of this government is linked to the observance and enforcement of ministerial standards ... unanswered questions remain." - Labor's Tony Burke on an internal inquiry which cleared Julie Bishop and Christopher Pyne.

Australian Associated Press