Bathurst Skin Cancer and Cosmedical Centre's Dr Vladimir Shcherbinin wants people to get their skin checked for cancer

GET CHECKED: Bathurst Skin Cancer and Cosmedical Centre's Dr. Vladimir Shcherbinin wants people to get their skin checked. Photo: BRADLEY JURD
GET CHECKED: Bathurst Skin Cancer and Cosmedical Centre's Dr. Vladimir Shcherbinin wants people to get their skin checked. Photo: BRADLEY JURD

Whether you have a concern or not, whether you're five-years-old or 60 or whether you have a history of skin cancer in your family or not, you should get your skin checked.

Dr Vladimir Shcherbinin, who works at Bathurst Skin Cancer and Cosmedical Centre, in NSW's Central Tablelands, said it's important to get even the slightest concern checked by a professional.

"Getting professionally checked is very important," he said.

"Why? Because 95 per cent of people come to me and say to me, 'I'm okay, I just want to check this one'. I look through the distance and say, 'I don't care about that spot because it doesn't look dangerous, but I really advise to check this other spot'.

"People don't pay attention to that, because they are not a doctor."

Dr Shcherbinin said the skin needs between 15-30 minutes of sun exposure a day and anymore increases the risk of skin cancer.

When going outside, he advises people to cover up, not necessarily with sunscreen but with a broad brim hat, sunglasses, long pants and long sleeve shirts.

He also recommends people to wear gloves when driving, as the hands are a common spot of concern for people that drive frequently.

And while the more you're exposed to the sun and the older you get leads to a higher chance of skin cancer, that doesn't mean young people can't get skin cancer, with Dr Shcherbinin saying he's treated melanoma in a child as young as five.

He said it's also important to eat nutrient-plentiful foods, such as fresh salads, greens and fruit, especially during the winter when people opt to have warm vegetables, as the cooking process drives out a majority of the nutrients in food that the body needs.

"I noticed in winter time, I see the dry skin in almost most of my patients," he said.

"Dry skin is a starving skin because the blood does not have those nutrients to nourish the the skin."

He also said it's important to know what colour skin cancer looks like, with 40 per cent of skin cancer a dark shade, while 60 per cent either red, pink, white or clear.

This story Don't forget to get skin checked for cancer first appeared on Western Advocate.