Local action inspires Nature Conservation Society recovery workshop opportunity on Kangaroo Island

RARE FLORA: Volunteers and botanists monitoring the recovery of the rarest of the rare, Asperula tetraphylla. The total global population of this species covers less than a hectare. Image credit: Dr Rick Davis
RARE FLORA: Volunteers and botanists monitoring the recovery of the rarest of the rare, Asperula tetraphylla. The total global population of this species covers less than a hectare. Image credit: Dr Rick Davis

As threatened plants have emerged and grown from the ashes across Kangaroo Island's burnt landscape so too have members of the community interested in the care and conservation of their local environment.

This interest has been so high, that the Nature Conservation Society of South Australia (NCSSA) has decided to offer free workshops to the community to build people's capacity to tackle nasty weeds and monitor the post-fire recovery of bushland.

The free community workshops on Saturday, April 24 will consist of expert presentations and field activities and is a great opportunity for those wanting to get involved in some "citizen science".

There is another presentation and workshop also at Parndana on this weekend, April 17, for local groups already involved in the NCSSA project.

Bluegum seedlings have sprouted in burned ground across Kangaroo Island, including this spot off Church Road. Photo: Stan Gorton

Bluegum seedlings have sprouted in burned ground across Kangaroo Island, including this spot off Church Road. Photo: Stan Gorton

Tasmanian blue gums are perhaps the most visible present weed threat post the January 2020 bushfires, and a weed that has gathered much local attention and action with groups of locals heading out weekly to help remove them.

But there are also other threats to the recovery of Kangaroo Island's rare and threatened endemic plant species and these need to be monitored.

Participants will learn how to identify plants and collect and voucher specimens, apply bushcare techniques and monitor the post-fire recovery of threatened plant species endemic to Kangaroo Island.

There will also be the opportunity to get involved in more long term threatened plant monitoring for those individuals and community groups keen to help the bush bounce back.

The NCSSA hopes that some local volunteers or groups may be interested in becoming citizen-scientists and continue to assess the post-fire recovery of these threatened plants at key sites.

For event details and registrations please visit EventBrite here, or email Bec Duffield at bec.duffield@ncssa.asn.auor visit the Nature Conservation Society of SA's Facebook page.

Comments

Discuss "Local action inspires bushland recovery workshop opportunity"

Please note: All comments made or shown here are bound by the Online Discussion Terms & Conditions.